Feeds:
Posts
Comments

DSCN0164

I have no data to support the opinions I write of in this posting.  So please do your own research before deciding, panicking, or acting on anything said below.

Today I was outside smoking in the damp rain when my smoking companion said that he had just surveyed the salaries of mining geoscientists (geologists and geotechnical engineers).  He noted that it appears that salaries for such folk are, on average, higher in Canada than in the USA.

My first reaction was to note that salaries for geoscientists in the oil sands and related consulting organizations probably skew the averages for Canada.  He promised to look into this.

Then I pointed out that if you look at geoscientists salaries in Orange County (California), Denver, or San Francisco you would find averages much higher than the USA average.  Afterall there are many states where salaries are low.  A geotechnical engineer working for a local authority in Iowa or Mississippi will drag down the average.

I returned to my office to field a call from one such person working in the oil sands.  He noted that Calgary is no longer a place of infinite jobs–most companies serving the oil sands overstaffed in the past in fear, and now find themselves with a surplus of engineers.   He said there simply are few jobs on offer now in Calgary–times have changed significantly.

He conceded that salaries are higher in the oil sands than in the rest of Canada.  He has just hired away from a Vancouver company a bright young engineer and is going to pay him more than the Vancouver consultant.  A good example of the drift of qualified folk from consulting to the mining companies themselves.  No wonder a few Vancouver consultants have laid off many or are considering reduced work weeks!

Yet another phone call told me off an Orange County, California consultant.  Just returned from South Africa, he is planning to lure bright mining geoscientists from South Africa to California.  Apparently, he thinks they are smart and in many ways ahead of USA engineers in innovative practices & solutions in the mining industry.  He thinks the industry can absorb and use them; and he can make money from them.  Good News!

I am not sure how you make sense of or put a common thread to these fleeting discussions.  Maybe the simple fact is that there will always be work for highly skilled people regardless of the state of the industry or economy.  Let me now what you know and how you think on these questions.

tumblr_n2vq4teobW1qcla2no1_500[1]

 

ddd

At this link are details of a new geosynthetic from CETCO. Basically it consists of two geotextiles between which is a reactive material selected to deal with contaminants commonly found in the mining and waste management industry. They describe it thus: Continue Reading »

DSC08556

More is said about mine closure than is done about mine closure.  Will they ever close Giant and Faro?  I doubt it.  Still if the topic interests you, here a few upcoming events. The InfoMine Mine Closure Conference in Belo Horizonte promises lots of information about mine closure in Brazil.  Not many of us can get that far south or want to go that far south. Last time there was an InfoMine conference in Belo, there were riots and protests and the delegates were confined to the hotel. Continue Reading »

DSC01702

The general approach to undertaking a risk assessment is well described in International Standard IEC/ISO 31010, which also provides considerable information about risk assessment methods. It notes, however: “The standard does not provide specific criteria for identifying the need for risk assessment, nor does it specify the type of risk analysis method that is required for a particular application.” Continue Reading »

DSCF2069

Below is a report that hit my email inbox today.  I repeat in full, not because mines are the main culprit, but because mines are probably NOT the main culprit.  This report is a sobering reminder that dry-cleaners, car-battery recyclers, old military bases, and jails are also major contaminators.  Yet so little is written or done about them—it is not a very sexy topic–so much easier to excoriate mining. Not that Giant, Faro, and a few other old mines are going to be cheap to cleanup. Continue Reading »

DSCF2355

Constructing covers over mining wastes at sites in cold climates involves consideration of these factors that are unique to cold climates: Continue Reading »

DSCF1854 - Copy - Copy

Today’s defeat of separationists and essentially racialist nationalists in Quebec is to be welcomed.  Even more so as today at the Cold Covers conference in Whistler two young engineers from Quebec were the bright stars of events.  They will be leaders in the future in all Canada in solving the issues of mine closure. Continue Reading »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 433 other followers