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Inlaid wood floor of the library of the Canadian Houses of Parliament

Continuing the postings on the new CostMine 2014 Survey Results- Canadian Mine Salaries, Wages and Benefits, here are some mine salaries.  First the range and then the average in thousands of Canadian dollars per hour.

  • General Manager = from 125 to 257 for an average of 202
  • Mine Manager = from 99 to 295 for an average of 169
  • Mill Superintendent = from 86 to 162 for an average of 131
  • Mine Engineer = from 80 to 153 for an average of 103
  • Mine Geologist = from 66 to 123 for an average of 97
  • Environmental Coordinator = from 70 to 123 for an average of 97
  • Personnel Manager = from 92 to 156 for an average of 129
  • Secretary = from 54 to 88 for an average of 65

I wonder which mine pays the Mine Manager more than the General Manager?  Or which mine pays the secretary $88,000 per year?

Here are some average salaries, first for surface mines, and second for underground mines:

  • General Manager = 199/212
  • Mill Superintendent = 126/139
  • Environmental Coordinator = 98/93
  • Secretary = 65/65

No clear pattern of difference that I can discern.

Some pattern in the type of mine you work for.  Some numbers, first for metal mines, second for diamond mines, and third for fossil fuel mines:

  • Mine Manager = 165/152/198
  • Mine Engineer = 96/98/115
  • Mine Geologist = 87/105/113
  • Environmental Coordinator = 95/82/103

Obviously better to work for a fossil fuel mine than a diamond mine.

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Ottawa as seen on a cold winter day from the Houses of Parliament

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Received the following by email. Not sure where it originated, or how widely it has been circulated. All these words remind me of growing up on a mine in South Africa. We used them all in common speech. So sad they cannot now be used by us to color or talk. Still you may enjoy. Sommer so! Continue Reading »

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At this link is an interview with Anglo American’s Mark Cutifani on the past progress and promised future performance of Anglo American.  His message: we will get there, with there being a 15% return on capital employed (ROCE). Continue Reading »

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The hall of the parliament building in Ottawa

It does make a difference to your wages if you work on a Canadian metal or diamond or fossil fuel mine.  Here are some numbers to highlight the differences.  I quote from the new CostMine 2014 Survey Results- Canadian Mine Salaries, Wages and Benefits. Here are some average wages by mined commodity in Canadian dollars per hour.  The first number is for metal mines; the second for diamond mines; and the third for fossil fuel mines. Continue Reading »

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Planning for the upcoming conference Geosynthetics Mining Solutions 2014 is well advanced. As the above news items attest, there is great interest in geosynthetics and this conference will focus on the use of geosynthetics in mining. We have many fine sponsors and a great slate of papers—with more still on their way. Please to be able to tell that Mike O’Kane and his folk at O’Kane Consultants have promised two great papers on the use of geosynthetics in the covers of closed mine waste disposal facilities. Continue Reading »

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Just published by CostMine is the 2014 Survey Results – Canadian Mine Salaries, Wages and Benefits.  I will survey some of the data in this and future postings.  First a look at average Canadian Mine wages (In Canadian dollars): Continue Reading »

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The most confident fellow in the meeting was the specialist in permitting from Toronto. He was old, like me, and in total command of his subject. He reminded us: “California is both the most difficult and yet the easiest state in the Union in which to permit a mine. It is easy because the process is simple: fill in the boxes, check off the items of the checklist, and it is done. It is the most difficult because you need to have done the work to ensure the right answer to fill in the boxes. If you do not have a comprehensive, well-thought-out, and defensive plan, you cannot fill in the boxes, complete the checklist, and get the regulators to say OK.” Continue Reading »

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