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No posts these past few days as I have been in Huntington Beach with kids and grandkids.  In between family time I have read Dickens’ Bleak House.  Many strange and mad characters in that book.  Victorians all I concluded; until I looked around me in Huntington Beach and saw the following two whose story I tell. (more…)

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Got a long lesson in using the new format CareerMine today.  This is what I found about mining jobs for engineers in Vancouver. First up is a job with Robertson GeoConsultants (RGC).  Probably no secret that I work for RGC.  Not full time.  I take off as much time as I want to so that I can blog and visit kids and grandkids.  In fact I will be off on Wednesday to the kids in California and then a month in Spain with my son and his family in a house on the beach.  OK, I like the rain in Vancouver as much as anybody—kind of sensuous and clean, what with the lights sparkling and the streets shining.  But time in southern California and southern Spain are not to be deprecated. (more…)

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Here is information I received as a comment on a recent blog posting:

California is an anomaly from the perspective that it is only one of 5 or 6 states or territories that do not recognize mining as an engineering discipline; along with Guam, Hawaii, Delaware and a couple of others. The need for being registered is driven primarily by the State Boards. There are several places in the industry where signatures are required: on 10K reports for certification of reserves. This requires a “qualified person” and since there are 20 states that don’t recognize geologists as a profession, then the role may be defined as engineering in some cases. There are a plethora of state and federal mining permits requiring a PE signature. Underground seals must be constructed and signed off by a PE. Roof Control and Ventilation plans and many environmental permits require signatures. As I said, California is one of the exceptions and I really don’t understand why mining is ignored when mining was at the core of the state’s formation. I will say that the lack of recognition by the State has caused some confusion regarding liability and accountability.

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Turned the clocks back in more than one way today.  The ordinary act of taking an hour off every clock so that we abandon daylight saving time and go back to normal time, whatever that is. The second clock-turn-back was watching Francesco Cavalli’s opera Elena. Monteverdi was the first opera composer.  I have watched many time his two surviving operas: Il Ritorno di Ulisse in Patria and L’Incoronazione di Poppea.  Both imminently watchable and hearable. (more…)

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Today I received the followings announcement by email.  I cannot find the original on the website of the BC Ministry of Energy and Mines (MEM).  Maybe they have not gotten down to posting it yet.  The announcement, in short, is that MEM has awarded Klohn Crippen Berger (KCB) a $1.5 million to help MEM evaluate the cause of the Mt Polley failure–more specifically to provide advice in conducting the “forensic investigation” into the breach. (more…)

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In February next year I shall go to the Society of Mining Engineers (SME) conference in Denver.  One evening I shall dine with Andy Robertson and his party.  We will celebrate his induction into the Mining Hall of Fame. This is a signal honor for him and due recognition of his many contributions to the mining industry.  He well deserves it.  Not that he needs more recognition–most people I speak to know and respect him.  He is well-known for his superior intellect, his accomplishments, and his human gentleness.  For he is first and foremost a gentleman in all meanings of the word. (more…)

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Just home from a four-week journey that took me to  Peru, Chile, Keystone CO, Banff, and Ekati NWT.  It is good to be back in the house where you can throw off the formalities of travel, eat simple food, and get drunk in private. They say that Peruvian food is the best in the world.  Indeed it is if you are in a fancy, expensive place in Lima.  But go to a mine and eat what the miners eat, and it is terrible beyond belief.  Rice & beans and other unrecognizable substances of gooey texture.  I lost weight.  Maybe it was the altitude = 14,500 ft.  You walk slow and breathe deep in those conditions. (more…)

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