Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘mining’ Category

DSC01702

The general approach to undertaking a risk assessment is well described in International Standard IEC/ISO 31010, which also provides considerable information about risk assessment methods. It notes, however: “The standard does not provide specific criteria for identifying the need for risk assessment, nor does it specify the type of risk analysis method that is required for a particular application.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

DSCF2069

Below is a report that hit my email inbox today.  I repeat in full, not because mines are the main culprit, but because mines are probably NOT the main culprit.  This report is a sobering reminder that dry-cleaners, car-battery recyclers, old military bases, and jails are also major contaminators.  Yet so little is written or done about them—it is not a very sexy topic–so much easier to excoriate mining. Not that Giant, Faro, and a few other old mines are going to be cheap to cleanup. (more…)

Read Full Post »

DSCF2355

Constructing covers over mining wastes at sites in cold climates involves consideration of these factors that are unique to cold climates: (more…)

Read Full Post »

DSCF2594

I cannot resist repeating this email.  It is an irresistible call to mining duty.  If only I were younger or less committed to family & work—I would do it immediately.  This is the email I received today: (more…)

Read Full Post »

DSCF2450

An advantage of being a consultant to the mining industry is travel to new places.   This past week no blog postings because I was travelling in Mexico to a remote mine.  Here is a brief travelogue. (more…)

Read Full Post »

tumblr_mym91nwEX21smkt89o1_500[1]

Here from this link, a few observations on the bad & good of mining—at least in Australia: (more…)

Read Full Post »

tumblr_n26c05nGZl1qcla2no1_500[1]

Some years ago a young reader of this blog contacted me and asked the following:

You might remember me; I think I commented on your post  Should I become a mining engineer?  I explained how I had applied to study at the Camborne school of mines but was unsure.  I was reassured on my choice thanks to your post.  Would I be in demand as a mining engineer? I don’t know how easy it is to find work as a mining engineer; are such privileges guaranteed? (more…)

Read Full Post »

PotD_1166 jmb[1]

Treehuggers don’t like mining.  They fear: the loss of trees; cutting down of old-growth forests; turning the soil to extract rare earths for their computers and electric cars; and anything that changes the landscape.  Their websites call for replacement of cyanide by corn-starch, no use of mercury by artisanal miners, and windmills made of solid wood conveying electricity by means we know not of. (more…)

Read Full Post »

P1020680

If you are interested in how mining companies fared in Canadian courts last year, you would do well to download and read the McCarthy Tetrault Mining in the Courts Year in Review Vol IV – March 2014 available at this link.  The volume includes detailed information about the facts leading to 21 court cases and decisions in Canadian courts that involved mining companies.  More important the volume provides clear and concise information about the court decisions and what these decisions mean for mining companies.  (more…)

Read Full Post »

tumblr_n1lsiiydTn1rxgcdmo1_500[1]

In his book The Pencil: A History of Design and Circumstance, Henry Petroski tells at length of early graphite mining and its impact on the development of the pencil.  From what I recall, for many years there was but one deposit in England that produce graphite of the right quality to produce workable pencils.  As one reviewer of the book writes: (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 437 other followers