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Archive for the ‘Community relations’ Category

Each year, each mining company produces an Annual Report.  Ignore the color pictures of locals, women geologists, heart-rending schools & hospitals built with mining profits, and go instead to the sections headed RISKS. (more…)

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Yesterday I received an email stating that a Technology Review I wrote had just been put up on the InfoMine website. Now, I haven’t had the chance to write many reviews so I am a little proud this as it is the first to be lovingly loaded onto a server somewhere. As I’m sure you have put together by now, that review is about the Impact Benefit Agreement (IBA). (more…)

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From Deloitte a new report Tracking the trends 2012, The top 10 trends mining companies may face in the coming year.  The report starts with this quote: (more…)

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I do not watch the Canadian Broadcast Company (CBC).  Seems nobody else around the office does either.  Personally I find the idea of a government-run radio and/or TV network repulsive—smacks of big brother.  And a waste of money, apparently a billion dollars a year.  (more…)

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  As I write, the results are in:  the Conservatives are the majority party in the Canadian parliament and the New Democratic Party is the official opposition.  The Liberals and the Party of Quebec are trashed.  The immediate question is what does this mean for the mining industry? (more…)

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Bombing Libya and the opera Ariadne Auf Naxos both force us to confront the questions of what is good and what is bad, what is moral and what is amoral, what are gods and men to do in the face of comedy, farce, & tragedy, what to do when the choice is life or death, and is it better to remain silent and survive, or die at the hands of a tyrant bent on genocide? (more…)

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The boat slide quickly along the calm sea, but tidal waves were forming and threatening a rough voyage.  We stood on the deck gazing at a blue ocean, green trees, and towering peaks of snow.  A peaceful scene wrought of turmoil and storm that reminds you the world is not always beautiful. (more…)

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   Here is an edited e-mail I recently received:

I am young mining engineer with three years experience.  I am at that point where I should really commit myself to the trade or back off and go a different direction.  I am thinking about an advanced degree/further education but I am not sure on what: Mining engineering, geotechnical engineering geared towards mining, or business/entrepreneurship.  Or just relax and enjoy my life and extracurricular activities like running/camping (bagdaddy.blogspot.com).  I have an undergrad in mining engineering from Virginia Tech  Any advice or thoughts would be really helpful.  Also, I might as well ask about this while I have your attention, how would you invest your money if you were my age (25).    (more…)

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The art, or is it science, of mine closure is still a youngster.  There is no agreed fundamental philosophy or even technical approach.  This is strange when you consider that mining has been around for a long time and many mines have been worked out.  Most have been abandoned as the many abandoned mine remediation programs attest.  Only in the past few years have we seen vigorous debate on the need for planning and contentious mine closure.  Much of this debate has been documented in the proceedings of the Mine Closure Conferences organized by the Australian Center for Geomechanics.  Yesterday I spent some time paging through the past conference proceedings.  Here are two extract that, to my mind, nicely capture the dilemma of those seeking a consistent philosophy of mine closure.  (more…)

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We will have to await the course of fighting lawyers to learn how this story plays out; but even now there is plenty to tell and plenty to cogitate.  It all relates to helping the democratically elected government of the DCR kill seventy of its own.  In short the story, as I pick it up from a number of sources, goes thus:  In 2004, rebels capture the town that controls the supply route to Anvil’s Congo mine.  Anvil provides transport for government troops (thugs) brought in to flush the rebels out.  The thugs move fast: they shoot upwards of seventy people and re-open supply lines.   Anvil says the government requisitioned such transport, and they had to obey.  Not so, say the NGOs, who claim Anvil sought government aid in flushing out the rebels.  (more…)

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