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Posts Tagged ‘Barrick’

pascua lama

There is no mine water solution for the Pascua Lama mine in the high Andes of Chile and Argentina.  Here is one report(more…)

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Some large consultants to the mining industry are doing very well–in spite of reports of a downturn in the profits of big mining companies.  Here is a quote from a long report on recent profits by AMEC: (more…)

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Soon after the fall of the Berlin wall, we descended on Wismut, East Germany with proposals to help them cleanup the old uranium mines, mills, and tailings impoundments that the Russians left behind.  The large American consulting firm that I was working for at the time, believed that with our UMTRA Project experience, we were well-suited for the work.  So too did a small Canadian consulting company.  (more…)

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On the right-hand side of this posting is my blog-roll.  Here I list all the blogs that I have found that are true blogs or reasonable facsimiles of a blog about mining.  I have just added a new one to the list.  It is called Beyond Borders.  It is run by Barrick and subtitled Responsible Mining At Barrick Gold Corporation(more…)

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Noir Canada

Canadian academics and free speech advocates are up in arms over two mining multinationals’ use of libel law to bury their critics in lawsuits.  I quote the most indignant part of the report:

Canadian academics and free speech advocates are up in arms over two mining multinationals’ use of libel law to bury their critics in lawsuits. Alain Deneault, Delphine Abadie, and William Sacher published a book called Noir Canada. Pillage, corruption et criminalité en Afrique that detailed well-sourced human rights abuses by the multinational resource companies Barrick Gold and Banro Corporation. The companies have responded with $11 million in lawsuits, aimed at bankrupting their critics with court fees. Barrick Gold has threatened other publishers on the basis of brief summaries of yet-to-be-published critical books. (more…)

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Today’s top of the news stories on the life of a mine include these three;

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Cortez Hill may soon be the next new mine in Nevada.  The environmental documents for the mine have just been approved .  Barrick plans to move fast to early production.  As always, there is a disgruntled Indian tribe threatening to delay things.

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It is Friday, so a round up of the week’s top stories about mining.  No, I am not going to write another posting about natives who like mining, or natives who do not like mining and are going to disrupt the 2008 and 2010 Olympics to make their point.  It all gets to be terribly repetitive and boring.  How much sympathy do they think I have. 

In my opinion, the best mining news story of the week is at this link, under the heading “Mining company digs up ancient marine reptile.”  The article tells of the finding of the bones of a 75 million year old marine reptile (an Elasmosaur) at the Buffalo Rock Mine near Lethbridge, Alberta.  You just have to enjoy a story that ends:

As to the Buffalo Rock Mining find being a relative of the Loch Ness monster, Henderson says this isn’t possible.   The Elasmosaur required sub tropical or tropical conditions to exist, while the waters surrounding Scotland are cold. In addition, says Henderson, the earliest record of stories about the Loch Ness monster date back only 15,000 years, and for it to have been an Elasmosaur, the first recollections would have had to have occurred long before that time.

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Nominee for the strangest mining-related event of the week goes to the release in Tanzania of a report entitled A Golden Opportunity? How Tanzania is failing to benefit from Gold Mining” I cannot find a copy of the report on the web, so I have to rely on a series of badly written articles to try to find out what the report says.  

Background to the report appears to be this:  “The research is published by the Christian Council of Tanzania (CCT) the National Council of Muslims in Tanzania (BAKWATA) and the Tanzania Episcopal Conference (TEC). It was funded by the Norwegian Church Aid and Christian Aid.”

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