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Posts Tagged ‘Greens Creek’

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Professor Jere Jennings who taught so many of us now-old civil engineers in mining used to say: “When you have read everything there is to read, when you have done all the calculations possible, then drink a bottle of brandy and exercise engineering judgement.” (more…)

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Paarl is the only South African brandy I can get in Vancouver.  It is rough—not like cognac—but rather the flavor of the veldt & bush, of scrub & dust, of a long-forgotten home & inequities long-rectified.  Thus inebriated, I blog. (more…)

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Most mines have a place where the miners eat.  Let us celebrate the cooks at these places by telling of the many fine meals we have enjoyed in these mining canteens. In celebrating cooks at mining canteens, I also seek to describe a job in mining that most do not write about.  If you like cooking, then maybe a job at a mine canteen is for you. (more…)

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In the past, we have all done silly things at mines that constitute safety violations.  Here I record a drilling program I worked on in 1981 and 1982 at the then-proposed Greens Creek mine in Alaska.  I post with only minor edits what I found last weekend amongst some old papers in the attic. (more…)

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Some people do cross-word puzzles.  Some do jigsaw puzzles.  And some become mining exploration geologists.  I suspect the same mental acuity, the same ability to form three-dimensional pictures in your head, and the same love of turning a few clues into a comprehensive whole are required. (more…)

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This afternoon’s Alaska Miners Association meeting presentations may not have been as broad in scope as a visit to the PDAC, but they definitively provided food for thought for investing in mining. (more…)

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Mining can be the safest activity.  What you need is the right safety program and skilled people to lead the mine safety program.  That is the message that comes through clear from the presentations this morning at the Alaska Miners Association Conference in Juneau, Alaska. (more…)

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The Alaska Miners Association Southeast Spring Meeting is in Juneau from March 15 to 18, 2011.  A preliminary agenda can be found at the link.  Topics for sessions include: training, safety, and exploration.  On the Saturday following the conference are field trips to Greens Creek or the Kensington Mine.  I know Greens Creek well, so may be able to persuade myself to go to the Kensington Mine.  (more…)

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Early October and Juneau is kind of shut down for the winter.  The cruise ships no longer dock, so most shops, brimming with tourist crap in the summer, are closed.  Only a few bars down the old main street are open and serving locals food and drink at rock-bottom prices.  I managed to get a new T-shirt from the Red Dog Saloon to replace the one I bought some seven years ago.  And found one item actually made in Juneau: Ray Troll’s Fish and Chips calendar. ( I thinks his work is great—and trust he is OK with me reproducing some of it here.  And to keep on the right side of bloggers law, I emphasize I was not paid for this endorsement–or any other endorsement, anywhere in this blog.) (more…)

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The answer will not come for many months, yet the arguments in today’s hearing before the U.S. Supreme Court are worth revisiting as they are significant to mining and environmental protection alike.  And to those who revel in dictionary distinctions—like Scrabble players.

The highest court in the land has chosen to hear the issue of whether the Kensington gold mine in Alaska may put their tailings into Lower Slate Lake, effectively filling it in time, or whether they should turn the tailings to paste and put them above-grade just like they do at the Greens Creek Mine not that far away. 

In practice, the court will not decide this practical issue.  Instead the court will delve into far “higher” matters.  Keep in mind the Supreme Court only takes on cases involving constitutional and interpretation-of-law issues.  And in this case the issue is the meaning and intent of the 1972 Clean Water Act.  Basically the question the court is asked to determine is whether tailings are “fill” or alternatively “discharge” in terms of the act. 

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