Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Tailings’

DSCF2891

Subaqueous disposal means placement of tailings into or beneath a water cover. Deposition of tailings into a lake is the most common subaqueous method. In many instances the embankment dam is constructed as a water retaining structure and the impoundment is filled with water into which the tailings are discharged. (more…)

Read Full Post »

DSC00297

Mike Jacobs of Goldcorp presented the keynote address today at Paste 2014 in Vancouver.  His topic:  Where mining meets the public–and why water is so important? He told us that Goldcorp annually publishes the statistics of the use of water at all its mines.  Commendable. Then he told us of the First Nations prayer ceremonies at the opening and closing of water seasons at their mines.  Incredible. (more…)

Read Full Post »

DSCF2692

The first official day of conference sessions at the Paste 2014 conference here in Vancouver.  Sean Wells, Director of Research for Suncor presented the opening keynote address. I cannot possibly here recount all he said.  All I can do is note a few points that he made that stuck with me.  In due course, his PowerPoint presentation will be available through InfoMine.  Get it and take deep thought over it, for his points are provocative, timely, and scary. He noted that the problems of oil sands tailings management are all about scale.  They oil sands produce so much tailings that the shear volumes and areas needed introduce problems not encountered in conventional tailings management.  I have heard it said that the two oil sands mines, Suncor and Syncrude, produce more tailings per day than the combined total of all the other mines worldwide.  His point is made. (more…)

Read Full Post »

DSCF2643

Day one of the  conference Paste 2014.   Actually the actual conference begins tomorrow.  Today there were short courses and meeting of friends and fellow travellers on the mining journey.  The most beautiful was a lovely lady from Brazil who is studying at the university of British Columbia for a semester and will be a mining engineer in a year or two.  We chatted over lunch and if she is, as I believe she will be, the future of mining, the profession is in good and beautiful hands. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Lesson learnt: in all O&M tailings management manuals put in a requirement to observe the penstock more carefully when tailings discharge water is not going through it—look carefully to see if water from another source is exiting the pipe and find out why.

This is a new lesson learnt. This is something I had not before now thought of.  But on the basis of what I saw and did today, a necessary action.

Add it to your O&M manual.

Here are some pictures of this situation:

DSCF3503

DSCF3511

DSCF3512

DSCF3513

If you have a penstock and seek to know more, contact me.

 

Read Full Post »

tumblr_mu6i5b7JV81soxwgpo1_500[1]

This week we held a successful EduMine webcast on Advanced Tailings Topics. Four good speakers; many good attendees; and interesting presentations. Here is my summary of one of the issues in tailings management that we argued.

Forty years ago, the best geotechnical engineer and dam builder I have ever worked with warned me not to construct outward curving embankments. “They get pressure from the inward curving part where the tailings is, and so they move or creep outward. As the embankment soil or rock is not good in tension, it will crack and you dam will fail.”

Ever since I have managed to heed his advice. But we still see many cavalier designs of outward curving tailings facility embankments. Or worse square or rectangular plans. Recall that terrible failure at the corner of the facility that poured tailings into the Danube.

Of course I was attacked for these ideas—easier to attack than to solve.

My advice is to look very hard at flatter slopes, buttresses, and the effects of long-term creep outwards. Oh and install thick filters and drains that are self-healing.

tumblr_mzb4gl0Y5s1smkt89o1_500[1] (2)

Read Full Post »

DSCF2172

These past two days I have had to deal with that knotty subject, computer modeling for mines. I proposed a series of 2D runs in order to get a feel for how groundwater flows into an open pit and from the tailings facility. The younger generation cried in horror at my simplicity.  “We need 3D models to truly replicate the situations,” they protested. I protested: “We are not modeling things on the computer in order to replicate reality and create an electronic simulacrum of what is in nature.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

tumblr_n2ujoysFfv1qcla2no1_500[1]

There is still time to join us for the upcoming EduMine webcast Advanced Tailings and Mine Waste Facility Design, Operation, and Closure.  Here is the link to the course. Even if you have taken other courses before conferences, or the other EduMine webcast on Introduction to Tailings, or our previous Advanced Tailings courses, I know you will find interesting and exciting information, perspectives, practices, and case histories in this new course. (more…)

Read Full Post »

mooi 52942b5236526[1]

Most engineers have no idea what the strength of a soil or tailings implies.  Let me write a little about the physicality of soil and tailings of a given strength. (more…)

Read Full Post »

tumblr_n02pduONhZ1ro76g2o1_500[1]

The promise of results from risk assessments is as seductive as the picture above.  The results are as fuzzy and fantasy-based as the picture above.  But doing risk assessments is as much fun as it would be to be a participant in the scene above.  Let me explain. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 487 other followers